Connect with us

Cross Walk Devotional

Daily Cross Walk Devotional: All Your Days

daily cross walk devotional

Daily Cross Walk Devotional: All Your Days

“Thine eyes saw my unformed body. All the years destined for me were written in your book before one of them came to be” (Psalm 139:16).

Last month, my family was saddened to hear the news of a friend who suffered a premature and tragic death. A believer in Christ, he had struggled with dementia for years.

At the funeral, the pastor read this verse from the Psalms:

“Thine eyes saw my unformed body. All the years destined for me were written in your book before one of them came to be” (Psalm 139:16).

What a reassuring and serene reminder that there is nothing we can do to increase or reduce our days. How particularly powerful those words are for anyone who has lost a precious one “too young.”

Before you were given birth to, the lord knew the number of days you would dwell on this earth. How absurd is that thought? Though situations and their timing don’t always make sense, we can trust that God, in his eternal wisdom, has written in His book a grand master plan.

As He reminds us in Isaiah 55:8-9: “’For My thoughts are not your thoughts, neither are your ways my ways,’ says the LORD. As the heavenly abode is greater than the earth, so my conducts greater than yours and my point of view than your yours.

No death is a shock to God, nor is any death out of the control of His will. Though none of us know in advance how long we will live, we do know that the Lord is with us from the beginning until our last breath and then for all eternity for those who have put their trust in Him as Deliverer.

Let us never distrust the importance and impact of any life no matter how short for God has ordained all of our days for His purpose.

Intersecting Faith & Life: Take a minute to reflect the words of Psalm 139:16 – a testament to the holy power and knowledge of God. Though life and death is a mystery to us, it isn’t to God. Let us all endeavor to serve and live for Him today and every day, so whether we meet the Lord tomorrow or in 50 years, we will be ready when our time comes.

Also Read: Of What Significance is The Cross of Jesus Christ?

Get more  Daily Cross Walk Devotional materials Here

Cross Walk Devotional

Baptism: A Representation Of Everlasting Faith In Christ

baptism

Every one of you should repent and be baptized in the name of Jesus Christ for your sins to be pardoned. And you will obtain the gift of the Holy Spirit. The assurance is for you and your children and for all who are far away and for all whom the Lord our God will call.'” Stated peter – Acts 2:38-39

Three years ago on Pentecost, I saw my godson’s been baptised. The pastor told parents and godparents to tell their children and godchildren of their baptisms always. He also encouraged all believers to continually remember their baptism and to remember what baptism means for those in the body of Christ.

When I was baptized at 23, the pastor introduced my baptism by saying “there is nothing supernatural about this water,” and he was correct. There is no magic in the water and the water itself will not transform you, but there is an unusual power and hope in the One who makes baptism possible – the One who baptizes in the Spirit and changes the heart.

Whether you lean to infant baptism or a believer’s baptism theologically, Christians can all agree that baptism is a representation of everlasting faith in Christ. For Christian parents, their baby’s baptism is a sign of their assurance to nurture the child to recognize and love God. For disciples, baptism is a representation of the eternal hope they have and a cue of the assurance that has been achieved.

Remember your baptism, but don’t just remember the day or the act – recall the gospel of Jesus Christ, which offers purpose to all baptisms. Recall that the Lord called you to Himself, and He selected you by name – not by any worth of your own but by His abundant gift of grace.

Read Also: Apostle Johnson Suleman: The Mystery In Prosperity

Throughout the Bible, we can see that God chose people whom we might consider not so deserving – polytheists, murderers, adulterers, harlots, liars, and all other sorts of sinners and sins combined. His point in showing us the flaws of the people He chose is to prompt us that no one is deserving. He can give compassion to anyone He chooses because all have fallen short of His glory, and no one can be vindicated and consecrated apart from Jesus.

When you remember your baptism, recall that you were nothing and God renewed you. You were hopeless, but He called you His own. He has accepted you as His child and successor. Recall the sin that caused the world to collapse, know the result of sin for every human being, and understand your constant need for the perfect Savior who lived, died and rose for all who would trust.

Intersecting Faith and Life: appreciate your Savior Jesus Christ for your baptism today, thank Him for the baptism of all those in the body of Christ and those in the covenant family, and pray for the baptism of many more–for no one is without need of grace and no one is beyond God’s reach.

Read Also: anger issues how to deal with them

Continue Reading

Cross Walk Devotional

Living with Need – Cross Walk Devotional

daily cross walk devotional

Do not bother about tomorrow, for tomorrow shall bother for itself. Enough unto the day is the evil thereof – Matthew 6:34

It all began with a huge doctor’s bill. Over the past few months I had been trying to do a better job at planning my finances. This had never been one of my strong points, but slowly, surely, I felt like I was starting to make progress toward becoming a true, dependent adult.

Then the doctor’s bill came. Aside from putting a huge dent in my finances, what made things even more infuriating was that I began to remember the appointment in question.

The doctor was almost two hours late and had left me waiting in one of those minor examination rooms, believing I’d die of old age before he arrived.

Next, there had been the tetanus report that left my arm feeling stiff and painful throughout the day. Now I was looking down at a small piece of paper that told me I was expected to pay a ridiculous sum of money for the inconvenience of both.

I decided the first thing to do was pray and ask God to help me with my finances. When I finished, I began flipping through my Bible for some logic of assurance.

I finally landed on this verse in Philippians:

I express joy in the Lord greatly that now at distance you have re-energized your worry for me. You were actually worried for me, but you had no chance. Not that I am speaking of being in need, for I have learned in any kind of situation I am to be content.

I know how to be humbled, and I know how to flourish. In any and every situation, I have learned the secret of facing abundantly and starvation, wealth and need. Am able to do all things through Christ who gives me strength. Ye have done well that ye communicated with my affliction.

This was not the response I had hoped for. No one likes being told to tighten their belt, and as I began cleaning up my apartment I couldn’t help feeling a little annoyed at God. Midway through my work, I understood I had just enough food in my store, my rent was paid, and my car hadn’t died on me yet. So perhaps I’d have to eat remnants for a few meals or spend an evening studying instead of going out, so maybe I was living with a little bit of need; I had a lot more than many.

Sometimes it’s easy to overlook the ways God has blessed our lives. We worry about what we don’t have, instead of looking around and acknowledging what God has already provided. So when times of need start to make you uneasy remember that God will always provide, though not always in the way you might expect.

Intersecting Faith and Life: Count your blessings. There are almost surely more of them than it may seem

Continue Reading

Cross Walk Devotional

Daily Cross Walk Devotional: Defying Gravity

daily cross walk devotional

Defying Gravity

“But who am I, and who are my people, that we should be able to give as charitable as this? All comes of thee, and thine own have we given thee 1 Chronicles 29:14

I was in elementary school, family friends made the choice to leave the States for Kiev, Ukraine. The family of seven, including children my age, had to downgrade from a four-bedroom suburban home to an 800 square foot flat. That involves getting rid of a house full of clothes, toys, yard tools, furniture, dishes & a whole host of personal choices and “needs.” Each family member had the luxury of one big trunk as they progressed halfway around the world.

For this family, however, the joy of sharing the Gospel in a former USSR satellite nation outweighed all their assets. My dad inquired from his friend how he was handling the sudden “loss.” His answer was telling.

“Truly,” the new missionary replied, “this is the most liberate thing I’ve ever done.”

This family found an exceptional liberty far before I began to sniff it out. For me, this reorientation is coming gradually, helped along recently by a little book called The Treasure Principle. In it, Randy Alcorn uses a science metaphor to explain why our friends felt liberated rather than empty. He writes:

It’s a matter of basic physics. The greater the mass, the greater the grip that mass exerts. The more things we possess—the greater their total mass the more they grip us, setting us in orbit around them. Lastly, like a black hole, they pull us in.

Consider our greed that way – the more stuff, the more mass. The more mass, the greater its gravitational pulls. And the harder it is to escape.

Compare this to David’s exhilaration in 1 Chronicles. He is humbled not by how much God has blessed him with – but by how much God has allowed him to give away. The king of Israel, a center of the ancient world, found his happiness not in the palaces and the women at his disposal, but in the act of returning to God was rightfully God’s. How many of us can say the same?

We live in a carnal, material world. But we have the chance to resist its hold on us with every cent, toy, and “need” that comes our way. Are you ready?

Intersecting Faith & Life: I want to reacquire the joy of giving in a more reasonable way than ever before. As Alcorn puts it, “We give because He first gave to us” the most treasured gift of all. What departments, relations, or other realm cause is on your heart?

Continue Reading

Most Popular

%d bloggers like this: